Monthly Archives April 2014

Hills Station of India

Jammu & Kashmir:

Jammu-and-KashmirJammu Kashmir’s most well known city, Srinagar, stands by the clear waters of the Dal Lake, and the rushing Jhelum. Srinagar is called the city of lakes, which has facinated tourist’s from centuries, with its beautiful picturesque Himalayan backdrop, glittering lakes that are surrounded by houseboats and Shikaras and the grandeur of Mughal architectural. Srinagar is abounded by the beauty of Himalayas and nature. Situated on the bank of Jhelum, Srinagar is a treasure trove of beauty. The major beauty of this city are its waterfalls and gardens which were made by the Mughal emperors. Snow capped mountains, chinar trees and beautiful valleys give a spectacular view to the city. Some important attractions in Kashmir valley are: Shalimar Bagh, Nishat Bagh, Chashma Shahi,...

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Fairs and Festivals of India

The ancient tradition of celebrating festivals goes back to the Vedic times of the Aryans. Ancient Indians used to express these occasions through the words SAMAJA (a gathering of people), UTSAVA (a festival) and YATRA (a pilgrimage or temple chariot procession). And today we use the word MELA (meaning a fair) rather than a SAMAJA. The Vedic scriptures and literature give many references to festivals when celebrations were carried on to honor gods, rivers, trees, mountains, the coming of monsoons, the end of winter or the first flush of spring. The celebrations not only include fasting & prayers, but also equally events of social & cultural significance, Performances of music, dance and drama took place side by side with more rugged physical activities...

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Desert Campus

India offers immense climatic diversity and topographical varieties. Deserts form the backdrop of many a legend in India, and in the present times, are touted as destinations of tourist interest.The Thar or Great Indian Desert is an arid region (800 km) long and (400 km) wide, in North West of India and East of Pakistan, between the Indus and Sutlej river valleys on the west and the Aravali Range on the east. Largely a desolate region of shifting sand dunes, broken rocks, and scrub vegetation, it receives an annual average rainfall of less than 25 cm. The sparsely populated region has a pastoral economy. Through the extension of canals fed with Sutlej and Beas waters, irrigation has reclaimed some land for agriculture along the northern and western edges...

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